Welcome to Miami Hawk Talk!

This website is a fan-operated and fan-oriented site primarily about athletics at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.

This website is not affiliated with Miami University, the Mid-American Conference (MAC), the National Collegiate Hockey Conference (NCHC) the NCAA, or any other collegiate or professional organization.

Top 3 college sports discussion

This discussion was created from comments split from: Blasi Fired per CHN.

Comments

  • mollauttmollautt Wealthy Alum
    Redsea said:

    I am sad that it had to come to this but i cant say that it is a bad move. We havent competed at a national level in a long time. My daughter is looking at Miami for college next year and when we go for tours and discussions the sport they talk about is hockey. Your flagship sport cant finish in last place every year.

    =>Mmmmkay.

    Miami Basketball Program Rated 47th Greatest All-Time by Street & Smith's

    Jan. 25, 2005

    OXFORD, Ohio -- In a special publication by Street & Smith's of the top 100 all-time greatest college basketball programs, Miami University's men's basketball program was rated No. 47. Fifteen categories were used to determine the top 100, including NCAA and NIT appearances and wins, conference championships and tournament championships, graduation rates, all-time winning percentages, NBA first-round draft picks and even mascot ferocity.

    After selecting the top 100 programs, editors at Street & Smith's asked for stories on each school that made the respective programs unique or special instead of rehashing the history of the program. Miami was one of two Mid-American Conference schools to make the top 100 with Ohio coming in at No. 86. Locally, Cincinnati was No. 10, Xavier was No. 48 and Dayton was No. 79.

    The publication is available on newsstands nationwide on Tuesday, Jan. 25. Copies also can be purchased at www.specialpubs.com/100Greatest.

  • mollauttmollautt Wealthy Alum
    Redsea said:

    I am sad that it had to come to this but i cant say that it is a bad move. We havent competed at a national level in a long time. My daughter is looking at Miami for college next year and when we go for tours and discussions the sport they talk about is hockey. Your flagship sport cant finish in last place every year.

    =>Mmmmkay (Part Deux)

    Cradle of Coaches

    Throughout the sports world, Miami has the unique reputation as the "Cradle of Coaches." Legendary football coaches such as Woody Hayes, Bo Schembechler, Ara Parseghian, Weeb Ewbank, Paul Brown and Sid Gillman all had roots at Miami, and the impact they left on the college football landscape can still be felt today.

    At last count, more than 100 Miami graduates were active in coaching or administrative work in the professional and collegiate levels. More than 30 of the men and women in the collegiate ranks are presently head coaches. Over the past six decades, 20 collegiate and professional coaches with Miami roots have stood atop their respective professions as National Coaches of the Year.

    Bob Kurz, a 1958 graduate of Miami and former Miami Sports Information Director, helped put the legacy in context with his book Miami of Ohio: The Cradle of Coaches, which lays out the program's proud coaching tradition from its humble beginnings through the 2002 season, when it was last revised. His inspiration for the biography came in 1959, when Miami graduates Paul Dietzel and Parseghian were coaching the No. 1 and No. 2 college programs in the land and Brown, Gillman and Ewbank were revolutionizing the professional game.

    Prior to the 2004 season, Kurz and his wife, Marian, provided a gift to the University to construct a Cradle of Coaches Plaza beyond the South endzone of Yager Stadium. The beautifully architected plaza provides a grand entrance to the stadium and have been adorned with life-sized statues of some of the program's greatest coaching legends.

    Miami has been the training ground for 21 National Coaches of the Year recipients at the professional and collegiate levels.

  • JWagsJWags Havighurstite
    mollautt said:

    Redsea said:


    =>Mmmmkay.

    Miami Basketball Program Rated 47th Greatest All-Time by Street & Smith's

    Jan. 25, 2005

    OXFORD, Ohio -- In a special publication by Street & Smith's of the top 100 all-time greatest college basketball programs, Miami University's men's basketball program was rated No. 47. Fifteen categories were used to determine the top 100, including NCAA and NIT appearances and wins, conference championships and tournament championships, graduation rates, all-time winning percentages, NBA first-round draft picks and even mascot ferocity.

    After selecting the top 100 programs, editors at Street & Smith's asked for stories on each school that made the respective programs unique or special instead of rehashing the history of the program. Miami was one of two Mid-American Conference schools to make the top 100 with Ohio coming in at No. 86. Locally, Cincinnati was No. 10, Xavier was No. 48 and Dayton was No. 79.

    The publication is available on newsstands nationwide on Tuesday, Jan. 25. Copies also can be purchased at www.specialpubs.com/100Greatest.



    Since this dubious list that counts f-ing mascots and graduation rates, Miami Basketball has had a winning percentage of 43.6%, 1 NCAA bid and 1 NIT bid with zero wins in either, and either 1 or 0 conference championships, depending if you include the year of publication.

    In that time, mid majors like Ohio, Buffalo, Northern Iowa, Southern Illinois, schools like Butler and Wichita St were mid majors who leveraged runs into visibility, dollars, and conference bumps.  Miami was a mid tier team in a mid major conference and slid further down the public's eye.

    Id still argue Miami football is the flagship with visibility and noterity even with some down years.  But Miami basketball is an absolute persona non grata when it comes to recruiting students to the university.  Kids born in 2001 don't care about some list from 2005 that shows Miami used to be pretty good but has done nothing since.  Id be shocked if that list was redone and Miami was in the top 75, much less top 100.  This isn't Indiana or a school with decades of truly national notoriety and success.  For a time Miami was a top 5 program in the 3rd most visible male college sport.  It brought in alumni excitement, donations and game watches.
  • mollauttmollautt Wealthy Alum
    JWags said:

    mollautt said:

    Redsea said:


    =>Mmmmkay.

    Miami Basketball Program Rated 47th Greatest All-Time by Street & Smith's

    Jan. 25, 2005

    OXFORD, Ohio -- In a special publication by Street & Smith's of the top 100 all-time greatest college basketball programs, Miami University's men's basketball program was rated No. 47. Fifteen categories were used to determine the top 100, including NCAA and NIT appearances and wins, conference championships and tournament championships, graduation rates, all-time winning percentages, NBA first-round draft picks and even mascot ferocity.

    After selecting the top 100 programs, editors at Street & Smith's asked for stories on each school that made the respective programs unique or special instead of rehashing the history of the program. Miami was one of two Mid-American Conference schools to make the top 100 with Ohio coming in at No. 86. Locally, Cincinnati was No. 10, Xavier was No. 48 and Dayton was No. 79.

    The publication is available on newsstands nationwide on Tuesday, Jan. 25. Copies also can be purchased at www.specialpubs.com/100Greatest.

    ***

    For a time Miami was a top 5 program in the 3rd most visible male college sport.  It brought in alumni excitement, donations and game watches.
    =>3rd most would be college soccer, followed by college baseball in 4th.  You could switch those two I guess.

    College hauckie, OTOH, does not even have programs in the western half of the contiguous United States outside of Denver.

    image
  • thechuck_2112thechuck_2112 Wealthy Alum
    edited March 19
    This is actually JWags' last comment, which got deleted for some reason:
    mollautt said:

    JWags said:

    mollautt said:


    ***

    For a time Miami was a top 5 program in the 3rd most visible male college sport.  It brought in alumni excitement, donations and game watches.
    =>3rd most would be college soccer, followed by college baseball in 4th.  You could switch those two I guess.

    College hauckie, OTOH, does not even have programs in the western half of the contiguous United States outside of Denver.

    image


    That leaves out Arizona St, a program who has fantastic fan attendance and a top 15 ranking in their 4th season.  They are basically the template for how expansion can work in the western states.  Feasibility studies are ongoing at other Pac-12 schools with resources (think USC and Oregon) as well as UNLV give the success of the Golden Knights.

    College soccer is an afterthought for most.  No TV coverage outside of the tournament and limited coverage overall.  Ditto for baseball which has some of the same struggles as MLB given its regional TV nature and coverage.  Id argue Lacrosse is more visible on a collegiate level than both outside of the CWS.

    College hockey has games on ESPN regularly, as well as NBCSN, Fox Sports, and CBSSN.  And thats not even including the tourney and Frozen Four.  There is additional combo coverage with the NHL in the ESPN family.

    But feel free to debate me with an obscure article or personal anecdote about HAUCKIE from 2004
  • mz343mz343 Senior Barfly

    This is actually JWags' last comment, which got deleted for some reason:

    mollautt said:

    JWags said:

    mollautt said:


    ***

    For a time Miami was a top 5 program in the 3rd most visible male college sport.  It brought in alumni excitement, donations and game watches.
    =>3rd most would be college soccer, followed by college baseball in 4th.  You could switch those two I guess.

    College hauckie, OTOH, does not even have programs in the western half of the contiguous United States outside of Denver.

    image


    That leaves out Arizona St, a program who has fantastic fan attendance and a top 15 ranking in their 4th season.  They are basically the template for how expansion can work in the western states.  Feasibility studies are ongoing at other Pac-12 schools with resources (think USC and Oregon) as well as UNLV give the success of the Golden Knights.

    College soccer is an afterthought for most.  No TV coverage outside of the tournament and limited coverage overall.  Ditto for baseball which has some of the same struggles as MLB given its regional TV nature and coverage.  Id argue Lacrosse is more visible on a collegiate level than both outside of the CWS.

    College hockey has games on ESPN regularly, as well as NBCSN, Fox Sports, and CBSSN.  And thats not even including the tourney and Frozen Four.  There is additional combo coverage with the NHL in the ESPN family.

    But feel free to debate me with an obscure article or personal anecdote about HAUCKIE from 2004
    I think this used to be the case with hockey, but the Power 5 conference networks have made baseball much more visible. BTN and especially the SEC Network cover baseball wall-to-wall because it's spring programming they need (BTN) and it's a popular sport (SEC).  I don't see nearly as many regular season college hockey games on ESPN compared to a few years ago.  You could argue other sports have made up ground on hockey.  There's more regular season lacrosse on tv, Golf Channel's coverage of the men's and women's golf finals is outstanding

    Maybe the Pac-12 should invest more in their football and basketball programs since they've been a joke the last few years.
  • QuinoaburgerQuinoaburger Wealthy Alum
    mz343 said:

    This is actually JWags' last comment, which got deleted for some reason:

    mollautt said:

    JWags said:

    mollautt said:


    ***

    For a time Miami was a top 5 program in the 3rd most visible male college sport.  It brought in alumni excitement, donations and game watches.
    =>3rd most would be college soccer, followed by college baseball in 4th.  You could switch those two I guess.

    College hauckie, OTOH, does not even have programs in the western half of the contiguous United States outside of Denver.

    image


    That leaves out Arizona St, a program who has fantastic fan attendance and a top 15 ranking in their 4th season.  They are basically the template for how expansion can work in the western states.  Feasibility studies are ongoing at other Pac-12 schools with resources (think USC and Oregon) as well as UNLV give the success of the Golden Knights.

    College soccer is an afterthought for most.  No TV coverage outside of the tournament and limited coverage overall.  Ditto for baseball which has some of the same struggles as MLB given its regional TV nature and coverage.  Id argue Lacrosse is more visible on a collegiate level than both outside of the CWS.

    College hockey has games on ESPN regularly, as well as NBCSN, Fox Sports, and CBSSN.  And thats not even including the tourney and Frozen Four.  There is additional combo coverage with the NHL in the ESPN family.

    But feel free to debate me with an obscure article or personal anecdote about HAUCKIE from 2004
    Maybe the Pac-12 should invest more in their football and basketball programs since they've been a joke the last few years.
    According to their own commissioner Larry Scott, the Pac-12 is more of a media company than an athletic conference.
  • AORedHawk33AORedHawk33 Wealthy Alum
    @Jwags
    According to:
    http://collegehockeyinc.com/tv-schedule.php

    The only college hockey being broadcasted on the family of networks is the Frozen 4 (unless I missed something). Also, ESPN has not broadcasted the NHL for years.
  • JWagsJWags Havighurstite

    @Jwags
    According to:
    http://collegehockeyinc.com/tv-schedule.php

    The only college hockey being broadcasted on the family of networks is the Frozen 4 (unless I missed something). Also, ESPN has not broadcasted the NHL for years.

    There are multiple games in ESPNU on the link you sent me. ESPN used to have more but Fox gained a lot of real estate there.

    And I didn’t mean actual NHL broadcasts. I mean chatter from guys like Buccigross and Melrose.
  • JWagsJWags Havighurstite
    mz343 said:

    I think this used to be the case with hockey, but the Power 5 conference networks have made baseball much more visible. BTN and especially the SEC Network cover baseball wall-to-wall because it's spring programming they need (BTN) and it's a popular sport (SEC).  I don't see nearly as many regular season college hockey games on ESPN compared to a few years ago.  You could argue other sports have made up ground on hockey.  There's more regular season lacrosse on tv, Golf Channel's coverage of the men's and women's golf finals is outstanding


    Maybe the Pac-12 should invest more in their football and basketball programs since they've been a joke the last few years.
    This is a fair point, especially for the SEC. However, it’s helped hockey as well. BTN is playing hockey games almost every Fri and Sat during the season. Pac12 network has started and will escalate if another team or two join ASU. ESPN+ signed on to broadcast another 500+ games this season. Baseball made up some ground with the SEC network. But other than that, expanded tv regional coverage, whether ESPN+ or conference networks, will likely be a tide that raises all boats

  • Re6H5wkRe6H5wk Wealthy Alum
    edited March 20
    I haven't read this whole thread, but a question for you (and before people throw a fit, I'm not actually suggesting this) :

    Would you be willing to give up football if it meant multiple Frozen 4s/national titles AND a basketball team that went to the NCAA Tournament 90% of the time with several Sweet 16 (or better, though no NTs) runs?

    I honestly would, but I'm not a huge football fan.
    JHVMUFBAlum
  • RedseaRedsea Wealthy Alum
    edited March 20
    Re6H5wk said:

    I haven't read this whole thread, but a question for you (and before people throw a fit, I'm not actually suggesting this) :

    Would you be willing to give up football if it meant multiple Frozen 4s/national titles AND a basketball team that went to the NCAA Tournament 90% of the time with several Sweet 16 (or better, though no NTs) runs?

    I honestly would, but I'm not a huge football fan.

    I am not sure I would care about the hockey enough- but you basically listed Xavier basketball and I probably would consider that change.  But I don't think that is at all possible.  

    I think dropping football would likely lead to less competitive basketball because you would probably be in the Horizon league.  If you dominated the Horizon league for 10 years you might get promoted to the Atlantic 10.  This year both of those leagues are rated below the MAC- most years the A10 is better- but not the Horizon league. 

    I also think that Oxford Ohio doesn't lend itself to stand alone basketball.  Whenever fans post about the great non football playing mid majors they are almost always in cities- the Big East is cities,  Gonzaga is in a city.  Olean, NY (St. Bonaventure) is not a city- but their basketball success level would not inspire me to drop football.   
  • JWagsJWags Havighurstite
    edited March 20
    Re6H5wk said:

    I haven't read this whole thread, but a question for you (and before people throw a fit, I'm not actually suggesting this) :

    Would you be willing to give up football if it meant multiple Frozen 4s/national titles AND a basketball team that went to the NCAA Tournament 90% of the time with several Sweet 16 (or better, though no NTs) runs?

    I honestly would, but I'm not a huge football fan.

    So like BC/BU/Denver hockey with a Xavier-esque basketball program? 100% for me. And I’m a BIG football fan.

    However, I realize the way football is changing and I don’t have the pipe dream of Miami leaving for a P5 conference. I know we will never contend for a national championship, so I’d much prefer National Championship runs in 2 sports versus the trade off of maybe an Orange Bowl every 10-20 years if things go PERFECT
    Re6H5wk
  • redhawk11redhawk11 Wealthy Alum
    How about give up hockey and have basketball make the tourney 20% of the time and have football win the MAC 15% of the time.
    AORedHawk33JCook32laxdaddyDICK
  • mollauttmollautt Wealthy Alum
    =>I would kill for just ONE CBI win every 20 years.
    Re6H5wkhawkattack06
Sign In or Register to comment.